New recipes

For Those with Power, Food Deliveries Resume in New York City

For Those with Power, Food Deliveries Resume in New York City


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

As the city’s roadways open up, vendor trucks are a welcome sight

Large cities like New York usually only stock two to three days of food at average consumption levels, according to a statement from the head of Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness as told to The New York Post. So the news that food deliveries have resumed amid the disaster recovery is a comfort.

In an effort to assuage concerns about food supply, food trucks have been given police escorts to travel on roads and bridges otherwise closed to public transportation. Major food supply links like the Hunts Point market are supplying produce and fast-selling staples like bread and milk so that consumers feel a return to normalcy.

For those displaced, many uptown restaurants are open and serving hot meals. Chipotle’s operating New York City locations are also running their "Boorito" promotion, offering burritos, burrito bowls, tacos, and salads for $2 to those in costume. The promotion runs nationwide as well.


Audio Description: A video informing New Yorkers of HRA's Emergency Food Assistance Program (EFAP).

HRA&rsquos Emergency Food Assistance Program (EFAP) provides funding to more than 500 community kitchens and food pantries citywide. If you need food, you can get help today at one of New York City&rsquos food pantries, which provide groceries to cook at home, or community kitchens, which provide hot meals.

Need to find an active food pantry near you? Look it up on the Get Food NYC map.

See a List of Food Pantries and Community Kitchens, or call the Emergency FoodLine at 866-888-8777. This is an automated hotline available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The NYC Unity Project&rsquos LGBTQ+ COVID-19 Online Guide has also compiled a list of food pantries and soup kitchens that have explicitly self-reported their desire to welcome LGBTQ community members. View that list here.

Want to work with HRA to provide food assistance? Find information on becoming a food provider.

If you need SNAP benefits, you can apply online through ACCESS HRA. Learn more on HRA&rsquos SNAP page.


Farm-to-City Food

Access to fresh, healthy food is a right for all. And right now, there are neighbors, volunteers, community groups, and local organizations mobilizing to run farmers’ markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs), Food Pantries, and Food Box programs to make farm fresh, healthy food accessible to communities across New York City.

These local food projects are improving the health and wellbeing of New Yorkers while supporting our urban and regional farmers. Some partner with local food pantries to increase food access to those most in need. Many are fighting for equitable access to healthy food by seeking to bring fresh, local food to low-income areas and communities of color.

Using this tool, you can find farmers’ markets, CSAs, food box programs, and fresh pantries near you!

Access Fresh Affordable Food

More than 307
program locations in New York City

Local Fresh Food Projects

Farmers’ Markets

Farmers’ markets are diverse and may be run by a large, centrally-managed network or by a single community organization, garden group, or impassioned neighbors running their own community-run market. Most markets operate seasonally, though some are open year round.

CSAs

CSAs are partnerships between a farm and a community that allow neighbors to invest in the farm at the beginning of the growing season when farms need support the most, in exchange for weekly distribution of the farms’ produce from June to November. Some CSAs even offer winter shares. CSAs are created by neighbors coming together to form a ‘core group’ that organizes neighbor sign-ups and coordinate with the farm. Some CSAs have SNAP access, and most CSAs have subsidized shares, where higher income households pay more and lower income households pay less.

Food Boxes

Food Box programs aggregate produce from participating farms and enable under-served communities to purchase a box of fresh, healthy, primarily regionally-grown produce. Through the power of collaborative purchasing, Food Box customers sign-up for a fresh food box a week in advance and for a set price that is well below traditional retail prices. Many Food Box sites accept SNAP and Health Bucks.

Fresh Pantries

The food pantries shown here are part of GrowNYC’s Fresh Pantry Project. These pantries accept donations of fresh local produce from New York area growers. They make healthy food available to anyone in need.

*Information for some locations have changed for this upcoming season.
Changes to the map will be made as data sourced from and maintained by DOHMH on the Open Data Portal is updated.

Making Fresh Food Affordable

New Yorkers have access to several different resources that make buying fresh fruits and vegetables more affordable.

SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) is a federally-funded program that helps low-income New Yorkers stretch their food budgets and buy healthy food. SNAP benefits can be used at participating farmers’ markets, CSAs and food box programs throughout the City.

Health Bucks are coupons you can use to buy fresh fruits and vegetables. You can get them by using your SNAP benefits at a market or through community organizations. For every $5 spent at a farmers’ market using SNAP, shoppers receive $2 in Health Bucks.

FMNP (Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program) benefits are available to WIC (Women, Infants and Children) recipients and low-income seniors to buy farm-fresh produce at farmers’ markets. Coupons are distributed every June or July through November at WIC and senior centers. The current coupon amount per market season is typically $24 for WIC FMNP and $20 for Senior FMNP.

Please explore the sites on the map above for more information on whether these and other programs are available.

More Resources

There are many organizations throughout the city dedicated to providing access to fresh healthy food to New Yorkers. Here’s a list of non profits you can look to for more information.

  • Farmers’ Markets
    If you would like to bring a farmers’ market to your community, contact GrowNYC, Harvest Home, or Down to Earth. If you are interested in starting your own community-run market, contact Just Food for more about their market training program.
  • CSAs
    If you’d like to start a CSA in your neighborhood contact Just Food for training and access to their CSA farmers’ network.
  • Food Boxes
    Don’t have a Food Box program in your community? Contact GrowNYC or Corbin Hill Food Project.

For feedback, comments, and questions please email [email protected].

Farmers’ Markets and Food Boxes
This open dataset contains Farmers Markets and Food Boxes registered with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Fresh Food Pantries
Information about Fresh Pantry Project locations taken from GrowNYC’s website and data on file with the City Council.

Just Food Markets and CSAs
Information about Just Food’s network of markets and CSAs can be found on their website.

Local Roots Food Boxes
Local Roots locations can be found on their website.

Visit the Council

We're located at New York City Hall (map). Council Members each have an office at 250 Broadway (map), as well as offices in each of their districts.

We want to hear from you

With your insight, the Council discovers ways to improve the City we all call home. So we're meeting New Yorkers where they are—online and in person. Keep your feedback coming!

You can reach us via social media, email, paper mail, or at your district office. For issues specific to a neighborhood, it's best to contact the Council Member representing that community.

Have questions, comments or feedback? Email us here.

Job Opportunities

The New York City Council is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please explore our Job Opportunities.

If you are interested in working at the New York City Council, please submit your resume and area of interest here.


The Indoor-Dining Debate Isn’t a Debate at All

Last Friday, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that New York City restaurants would be allowed to resume partial-capacity indoor dining on Valentine’s Day—in a non-pandemic year, one of the hospitality industry’s busiest nights. The following Monday, at his daily media briefing, Cuomo faced a question of urgent relevance to this decision. In New York State, the COVID-19 vaccine is now—at least, in theory—available to health-care workers, teachers, grocery-store employees, people over the age of sixty-five, and others constituting what the state has labelled groups 1a and 1b. Restaurant workers, though, were not yet included in either group. If Cuomo was going to reopen the city’s restaurants, shouldn’t their workers—including delivery couriers—be made eligible for the vaccine? “You want to add someone? We already don’t have enough,” Cuomo responded. “Who do you want to remove? You want to remove teachers? Police? Fire? Sixty-five-plus?” The push to include restaurant workers in group 1b was, he added, a “cheap, insincere discussion.” Less than twenty-four hours later, after weathering considerable backlash, he reversed his position, sort of. Mostly, he kicked the brick down the road to city, county, and other local authorities. Restaurant workers may be added to vaccination group 1b, Cuomo said, if regional health departments “think it works within their prioritization locally.”

Throughout the pandemic, Cuomo has excelled at these games of jurisdictional hot-potato, especially when it comes to management of New York City, a job he shares with Mayor Bill de Blasio, his bête noire and favorite punching bag. The city’s restaurants and other retail businesses have followed an independent schedule of closures and reopenings, separate from the rest of the state, and the two men’s months of rapid-fire, sometimes contradictory declarations have left New Yorkers in a state of agitated confusion. (According to a recent Times report, Cuomo’s peremptory approach to pandemic policy has also led to the departure of a worrisome number of his top health officials.) This is the city’s second flirtation with a return to dining in: in September of last year, Cuomo allowed restaurants to reopen at twenty-five-per-cent capacity, as long as they met certain safety requirements. Thirteen weeks later, in mid-December, the experiment came to an abrupt halt faced with spiking infection rates, and fearing even more transmission over the holidays, he again banned all indoor dining statewide.

Struggling restaurants that try to follow the ricocheting rules have mostly relied on takeout and delivery, outdoor dining (a difficult sell in the depths of winter, even with heat lamps and yurts), and alternative revenue streams such as grocery sales, T-shirt lines, and meal kits. Opening dining rooms at twenty-five-per-cent capacity, many restaurateurs have pointed out, won’t draw enough additional revenue to cover their overhead, or rehire a full staff, or make a dent in months of accumulated rent and taxes. Conversations I’ve had with servers, cooks, and other restaurant workers overwhelmingly boil down to anger and fear: they feel trapped between a paycheck (and, for some of them, the customer-is-always-right performance that a tip-based income demands) and their personal safety—a November Stanford University study identified full-service restaurants as “superspreader” sites, and a recent University of California analysis found line cooks to be the workers at highest risk for death from COVID-19. When the city’s dining rooms reopened in September, the seven-day average for new infections was in the three hundreds on December 11th, when Cuomo shut them down again, the average had climbed to 3,391. On Friday, when he announced the Valentine’s Day reopening, it was 5,579—sixty-five per cent higher than the figure he’d deemed too dangerous the first time around. Cuomo’s administration has pointed out that the current numbers are trending downward, and as of Tuesday de Blasio has extended vaccine eligibility to the city’s 317,000-plus restaurant workers. But, even if all of them could start the vaccination process today, they wouldn’t receive their second doses for weeks—little comfort to restaurant workers who will face indoor customers in just nine days.

Why, then, allow restaurants to open their dining rooms at all? I imagine it’s to create the soothing illusion of progress—against the virus, against economic disaster, toward some sense of a return to normalcy. There are two parallel narratives about the efforts to combat COVID-19. One is about Big Decisions: its protagonists are mayors, governors, health officials, Presidents its story is told through reopening phases, infection rates, movement restrictions, economic indicators, vaccine rollouts. The other is a quotidian one, a story of what we’re all actually doing in our daily lives. Our individual, everyday choices involve a personal calculus weighing compliance against convenience, risk against reward: going to the grocery store versus getting food delivered, taking your mask off if you’re alone on the sidewalk versus leaving it on, maintaining six feet of distance from friends at an outdoor gathering versus letting yourself slip just a bit. The more chaotic and unreliable the systemic narrative, the more vital individual vigilance starts to feel—we’re left with a pervasive sense that, in the face of government mismanagement and indifference, it is up to each of us to save what those in power are allowing to die: if the businesses we love close down, it’s our own fault if the people they employ are out of work, it’s our own fault.

We are not, of course, individually responsible for the sort of relief, support, and subsidy that ought to be provided by a competent government, but surely we are obligated to consider the impact of our actions in light of all that has happened during the pandemic so far. In December, the city and state’s worsening infection rates and climbing death tolls were not the fault of desperate restaurateurs who chose to open their dining rooms, nor were they the fault of people who trusted the leaders who gave them permission to go and eat. But today, on the cusp of a second, nearly identical experiment with indoor dining, the moral weight of our individual decisions has increased. We know what happened last time we know the limits of what this move can fix, and the extent of whom it can harm. There is a flip side to the fallacy of individual responsibility during the pandemic: just because we’ve been given permission to do something doesn’t mean that it’s the right thing to do.

There are certainly noble, community-minded reasons for people to want to eat in restaurants right now—to help a business’s bottom line, to boost the tips of the front-of-house staff—but they can be fulfilled without informing the double-masked gentleman at the host stand that, yes, you’ll be a party of four tonight. Order takeout and leave a tip for the staff as if you were dining in buy a gift card—and, to help the considerable number of servers, bussers, etc., who remain unemployed, donate to hospitality-worker relief funds, restaurant-staff GoFundMes, and the like. The arguments for actually taking a seat inside are more inward-facing, and emotional: we’re bored of eating at home, we miss being social, we miss being served it’s my birthday, it’s my anniversary, it’s Valentine’s Day and Andrew Cuomo told me to do it. All these reasons, at their core, come down to the same thing: I really want to. And who doesn’t want to? Who wouldn’t love to go to a restaurant right now, to sit with friends, order a few dishes, take bites off one another’s plates, and tipsily wander to the bathroom and maybe make a game-time call about ordering the chocolate mousse even though we’d all agreed to forgo dessert? We are tired of shivering under heat lamps, and eating yet another meal out of takeout containers, and staring out the windows of our homes and cars at the world beyond. Given where we are right now, though, in New York and in the country as a whole, “I really want to” doesn’t feel like enough.


Real estate industry rejoices over CDC’s easing of mask and social-distancing restrictions

The city&rsquos real estate community found cause to celebrate on Thursday after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines that people who are fully vaccinated are not required to wear masks or maintain a 6-foot distance indoors.

Masks had been required within all indoor spaces, including restaurants, residential apartment buildings, offices, retail stores and museums. The CDC also had recommended a 6 feet of social distancing to stop the spread of Covid-19. Now the vaccinated population is excused from wearing a mask, except in certain circumstances such as while traveling by public transportation or while in a health care setting, correctional facility or homeless shelter. There is no social-distance recommendation for working indoors.

The new rules spell good news for the real estate industry, which has been suffering through a lull of office renters, buyers and tourists during the past 14 months.


The Doorman’s Dilemma: What to Do With All Those Packages?

As president of the board of his Midtown East co-op, Dennis Paget has reason to walk a little faster when a particular fellow resident comes into view. To do otherwise would mean enduring yet another stern lecture about the building’s supposedly dilatory parcel delivery service.

“She always tells me: ‘I moved in here because it’s a luxury building, and I’m not getting my packages fast enough,’ ” Mr. Paget said.

He said he tried to explain that “we don’t have the staff, that the porters are also taking out the garbage or cleaning the floors.”

“I tell people they can get their packages delivered,” he said. “But I also tell them it may not be in an hour, it may not even be today, it may be tomorrow. If you want it now, come down to the lobby and get it.”

The proliferation of online shopping, to say nothing of grocery and food delivery services like Fresh Direct and Seamless, makes every day seem like Christmas in many New York City apartment buildings.

Consequently, full-service rentals, co-ops and condominiums that once would have gotten a parcel to a tenant before the U.P.S. truck pulled away from the curb, are rethinking their policies or staffing to deal with the brown paper pileup from Amazon, Zappos and elsewhere. The result of that rethinking: Residents accustomed to having packages delivered to their apartments may have to pick them up in the lobby, and buildings where every outside delivery person was once accompanied by a staff member might, under certain circumstances, allow some to go unchaperoned. The alternative, of course, is to hire additional staff to hold onto a “full-service” label, and in the process, raise monthly maintenance charges.

“I’ll bet our volume has tripled in the last five years,” said Larry McCool, the resident manager of Mr. Paget’s 260-unit co-op. “There’s a big debate here about whether we’ll be delivering packages at all anymore.”

Some buildings are carving out or expanding package rooms and buying multiple refrigerators to hold residents’ perishables until they can get home to claim them. Still others are investing in web services like BuildingLink or Verizon Concierge that let residents know, via lobby monitors or email, that they have a package or two or seven.

“The good news is that we thought about this quite a while before the issue of drones from Amazon came up,” said Tami Veikos, a senior vice president of Related Management, which has seen a 20 percent increase year over year in the number of packages delivered to the Related Companies rentals and condominiums. “A couple of years ago, we gave our development team a book of guidelines on how to plan storage for new buildings.”

For buildings with up to 100 apartments: 250 square feet of storage, with an increase of 50 square feet per additional 100 units. The package rooms “all have double-hanging capability,” Ms. Veikos said, and at least one refrigerator. Residents can choose to fetch their own parcels or have them delivered by a doorman or a porter.

Image

“We would never ask a resident to come and pick up a package, even in our biggest buildings,” she said. “We’ll put your food in the fridge and put your dry cleaning in your closet if that’s what you want. It’s customized. And it helps free up the concierge staff, because it means they don’t have to be constantly going to the package room.”

Lobby-level janitors’ closets have been repurposed as storage rooms in some buildings, and existing package rooms have been redone to make them more efficient, according to Gerard J. Picaso, the managing director of the Halstead Management Company. “And when some of our buildings have done lobby renovations, they’ve expanded the package room as part of the alteration,” he said.

Andrew Gerringer, the managing director of Marketing Directors, a development, leasing and marketing company, is working on a 321-unit rental property in Long Island City, Queens, whose plans call for a 400-square-foot storage space — “that’s the size of a studio apartment,” he says — directly behind the concierge’s desk.

Other buildings have outfitted their lobbies with furniture that is attractive and functional — for example, an armoire to hold small parcels. Buildings that don’t have dedicated package rooms (or package highboys) or don’t have sufficiently commodious package rooms use the lobby to hold the overflow. “You walk into our building and the Fresh Direct boxes are stacked almost to the ceiling,” said Mr. Paget, whose building doesn’t permit deliveries to apartments, perishable or not, unless a resident or housekeeper is there to receive them. “It’s very ugly.”

Of course, technology is lending a hand. Gateway Plaza, a six-building rental complex in Battery Park City, is rolling out a service that lets a doorman log and track packages electronically. “Residents can check a monitor in the lobby and they also get an email notification when they have a package then they go pick it up at the front desk,” said Mario Gaztambide, a senior vice president of the LeFrak Organization, which developed Gateway. “The lobbies were rebuilt a couple of years ago, and as part of that, new package rooms were built,” Mr. Gaztambide said. “But no matter how big they are, they’re never big enough. That’s where electronic notification comes in. It frees up space when people come and get their packages.”

Some buildings are asking a little more of their residents, requiring them to come down to the lobby and pick up their restaurant orders after, say, 8 or 9 p.m. when there’s a skeleton staff. Other buildings are adjusting the schedules of porters and doormen and tinkering with “to-do” lists to deal with Fresh Direct and restaurant deliveries.

“We won’t leave packages if you’re not home,” said Gail Wainer, a property manager, primarily for Upper East Side co-ops, at Wallack Management. “But a lot of our residents have nannies or housekeepers, so during the non-busy part of the day, between lunchtime and school letting out, the doorman will call and say, ‘Mrs. Smith has packages. Should we bring them up?’ It’s a retraining thing for staff,” Ms. Wainer added. “The guys who sat around in the back elevators are working a little harder now.”

Common sense has proved useful in easing the backlog. “We called Fresh Direct and told them it would be much more efficient if they sent the same guy to the same property every day,” Ms. Wainer said. “He’s a known quantity, so we let him make his deliveries unaccompanied.”

In some buildings, Halstead Management has changed the breaks and dinner hours of doormen so there is a full complement of staff during peak periods and has extended the hours packages can be delivered to service entrances. “Now, the porter on duty is still accepting packages at 6:30 so as not to crowd the doorman at the front door when people are coming home at the end of the work day,” Mr. Picaso said.

Similarly, Chelsea Mercantile, a 354-unit condo, has increased the staff presence at dinner time to ensure there’s coverage in the lobby and someone to act as an escort for food delivery people from Seamless. “The board is also looking into having a separate desk for package pickup,” said Stuart Moss, a resident. “They want to keep things feeling gracious when guests are announced, without the added congestion of people coming home from work and trying to claim their dry cleaning.”

Luxury buildings on Fifth Avenue, Park Avenue and Central Park West that have long delivered packages are not about to stop. “But generally, it’s not a good use of a staff’s time,” said Mr. Gerringer of the Marketing Directors.

For apartment dwellers who think otherwise, “there are ways to tweak things a bit,” Mr. Picaso said. “It may mean paying overtime to a porter or hiring more help. This is a problem that can be remedied by money if shareholders want a particular level of service.”


The Customer Is Not Always Right

Chef Angie Mar was in no rush to re-open indoor dining at her upscale New York City steakhouse, the Beatrice Inn.

“I didn’t feel super comfortable with it yet,” says Mar, explaining that she had yet to purchase the necessary air filtration system and figure out protocols to ensure the safety of her staff and guests. It was an early fall day and the weather was still pleasant, so she stuck to the 12 tables she could comfortably seat outside. A woman showed up for dinner with her boyfriend in tow, demanding a table indoors. When Mar explained the situation to the customer, offering her a table on the sidewalk instead, she was met with extreme vexation. 

“I can’t sit outside! I am wearing Gucci,” huffed the woman. 

It’s a revealing interaction, one of thousands, that displays just how deep customer entitlement runs in the hospitality industry𠅊nd restaurant workers are at a breaking point.

The COVID-19 pandemic has ravaged the industry, decimated wages, and sent restaurants into a tailspin of closures, reopenings, and ever-changing guidelines, all while exposing workers to health risks. And there is no real end, or government assistance, in sight. To make matters worse, customer entitlement is at an all-time high, according to the numerous servers, maitre𠆝s, managers, and owners that I spoke to across the country. “It’s obscene to me the way people are acting,” says Mar.

Customer entitlement, or what customers believe they are owed, has long been an issue in the hospitality industry. Restaurant workers swap stories like war veterans about ridiculous demands, difficult customers, and bad tippers. But the pandemic, and the terrible customer behavior that has come with it—impatience regarding wait times, name-calling, frustration over limited seating and menu options, and disregard for safety protocols—has only served to highlight how pervasive and, frankly, dangerous the problem really is.  

“We are expected to provide them with above-and-beyond service, even if they are abusive. It makes us feel like we are not allowed to have the expectation of being treated like a person.”

This issue of entitlement is rooted in the popular adage “The customer is always right,” which sits at the center of American hospitality. “It was definitely something that was hammered into me when I first started in this industry,” says Lauren Friel, the owner of Rebel Rebel in Somerville, MA. “I was told that not only is the customer always right, but we want to awe and delight them. The idea is that we will bend over backwards for the guest.” 

Liz, a server whose name has been changed because she requested anonymity, says she works in a similar environment. At the steakhouse in Connecticut where she is currently employed, management enforces a culture of 𠇊lways accommodating the guest” at all costs.

“We are expected to provide them with above-and-beyond service, even if they are abusive,” she says. “It makes us feel like we are not allowed to have the expectation of being treated like a person.” 

The idea that the customer is always right is pervasive not only among hospitality professionals, but also among customers themselves. “We’ve taught the American diner that there are no boundaries and they can ask for anything and everything, and that it should be given to them,” says Friel. 

The precise origin of the phrase “The customer is always right” is not known, but its popularization is most commonly attributed to three men: Harry Gordon Selfridge, John Wanamaker, and Marshall Field, all of whom founded popular department stores around the turn of the 20th century. At the time, �veat emptor,” which translates to 𠇋uyer beware,” was the more common attitude. It placed the onus on the customer to make sure everything was correct𠅊nd placed zero responsibility on the company to do right by the customer. The gradual rise of the phrase “the customer is always right,” however, shifted the power balance away from the company and toward the customer. 

This notion was solidified in the American restaurant space in the mid-1990s, in part due to the release of restaurateur Danny Meyer’s industry-shifting book, Setting the Table. Meyer advocates for building a culture of “yes” in the book, recounts Miguel de Leon, the wine director of Pinch Chinese in New York City. It was something that was common in Meyer’s establishments and quickly spread throughout the industry.

“I saw that customers almost always got what they wanted,” writes Keenan Steiner in Grub Street, about his time as a server at Meyer’s flagship restaurant, Union Square Café, adding that employees often referred to the restaurant as “the house of yes.”਋ut it begs the greater question, says de Leon, of “Yes for who?” The answer under the culture Meyer evangelized is the person with the money, which in the case of restaurants is the diner. “The commodification of service becomes completely transactional,” says de Leon. "It becomes about what the restaurant can do for the diner, he explains. “There is a lot of harm in that.”

Hospitality workers are often drawn to restaurant work because they like to take care of others. 𠇊 huge reason why we are in this business is because we want to make people feel good, make them feel special, and make them feel cared for,” says Friel. �ing of service and serving others is a very noble thing,” adds Caro Blackman, the maitre d’ of Maydan in Washington, D.C. She believes that most people who work in hospitality are empaths who want to nurture other people. “I just don’t believe the customer is always right. That’s a very unhealthy expectation,” says Blackman. 𠇊ny healthy relationship has to have healthy boundaries, period.” 

American diners, however, struggle with the concept of boundaries, which Friel attributes to the lack of clear industry standards for what hospitality should look like. “There is no rubric, no guide to tell you how long is too long to wait for something. Is it one minute? Is it five, or ten?” Increasingly, the diner decides what those boundaries look like, based on their own expectations. It gets dangerous, says Friel, when those desires and expectations “start to encroach on someone else’s humanity.” 

In its current iteration, hospitality feels like a one-way street, where customers are emboldened to make impossible demands and engage in behavior that can be disrespectful. It’s not uncommon for diners to make unreasonable food requests. Abigail, a server in Charleston, South Carolina, who asked to be identified only by her first name, says that at a popular Southern restaurant she used to work at, customers would demand dishes not on the menu, like a baked potato or a certain type of fish. A manager would then be tasked with picking up the dish from a restaurant across the street to make the customer happy. She also recalls the table of three women who would frequently split one rack-of-lamb order between them, but demand the lamb be cut into three pieces and cooked at three different temperatures—no matter how busy the restaurant was. 

Customers throw temper-tantrums when service doesn’t meet their personal expectations. Liz recalls the story of a customer who was so upset at the size of the free birthday dessert given to his daughter that he berated the staff until the cops were called. Another night, a patron came in demanding a seat at the packed bar. When the bartender was unable to magically conjure up space, the patron threatened to go to the corporate offices “to make sure she lost her job because she couldn’t make people get up out of their seats for him.” 

Instances of name-calling are quite common, too. Judy Ni, the owner of Baology in Philadelphia, recalls the story of a customer berating a young employee, who is Black, calling him a number of derogatory names and racial slurs, including the N word, because he wasn’t given his order “quick enough.” Jeffrey S., a server at a seafood chain in Connecticut, witnessed a woman scream slurs at his coworker of Latin descent and call him an idiot repeatedly because she was unhappy with her wings. (There was nothing incorrect about the order, says Jeffrey.)

"I make sure to stand far enough away when waiting on a table so customers can’t touch me."

Blackman recalled the time a customer remarked that she would “probably drive her future husband to drink.” Ursula Siker, the owner of Jeff & Judes, a Jewish deli in Chicago, says customers have sent harassing DMs to her restaurant’s Instagram account, calling her “unprofessional” and 𠇊 disgrace” due to wait times for their food. 

Diners often feel entitled to restaurant workers’ personal stories and space. A customer once sent an angry email to a restaurant owner because a server in Phoenix, Arizona, who asked to remain anonymous, wouldn’t reveal the meaning of a deeply personal tattoo located on his arm.

“My tattoos represent past relationships, old buddies, and a friend I lost to suicide,” says the server. “They are my memories. They are my experiences. I didn’t get them for you.” The disregard of physical boundaries is a rampant issue, too. “It’s why I make sure to stand far enough away when waiting on a table so customers can’t touch me,” says Abigail. 

Many servers are reporting that the lack of respect for boundaries has only gotten worse since the pandemic kicked into high gear. This is especially troubling given that boundaries have grown even more important to ensure the safety of both restaurant workers and customers. 𠇊 lot of people have not been respectful towards us with the COVID restrictions,” says Jeffrey. He frequently gets requests for samples of sauces or extra pieces of food like shrimp or corn (for free). “They really think I’m going to go back to the kitchen and jeopardize everybody in this restaurant to get them extra things I’m not even supposed to be touching.” 

Many customers refuse to wear masks, or get angry when asked to wear a mask at the door. “We call them ‘mask-holes,’” says an operations manager of a restaurant group in Mississippi who asked to remain anonymous. They often take their anger out on the people working at the host stand, who are frequently some of the youngest employees of the restaurant group.

“They are just doing as they are told,” she says. “It’s hard for people to understand that to dine with us, you have to follow the safety protocols, because while they might only be here with us for an hour or two, our staff is here anywhere from four hours to ten hours.” 

Nayda Hutson says she has similar issues at her Charleston pizzeria, Renzo. She must constantly combat the “immature” behavior surrounding masks, she says, recalling a customer who repeatedly tried to enter the restaurant mask-less. He was a doctor, no less, who worked around patients with COVID-19.

Working at a restaurant in 2020 has meant constant exposure to people who don’t take safety, or the health of service workers, seriously. Abigail recalls overhearing a table at her previous restaurant discussing how they recently attended a huge party at a local creek in the hopes of catching COVID-19 and “getting it over with.” “I had to warn the server and the bussers to make sure to wash their hands extra after dealing with this table,” she says. “It’s just so awful.” 

It’s incredibly frightening too, says Liz. “My job has never been more absurd, more political, and more dangerous.” She says that she is constantly dealing with diners speaking to her from less than ten inches away with no mask on, due to the dining room being so loud, even at 50 percent capacity. At one point, the entire kitchen staff at Liz’s restaurant got sick. “We are really, really scared," she says. "I have personally had a family member die from this.” Jeffrey carries a special kit that he put together for himself in his fanny pack filled with sanitizer so that he can clean anything he touches. He is incredibly worried about getting someone else sick, having already lost three family members during the pandemic.

Diners expect a magical world when they walk into a restaurant. “We create a world where they get incredible food, impeccable service, the music is beautiful, they get everything they want, they are drinking, they are happy,” says Abigail. “The norms [and realities] of the outside world don’t apply.”

And during the pandemic, diners are seeking normalcy. Customers don’t like that the safety measures, such as mask-wearing and temperature checks at the door, keep drawing attention to the fact that there is an outside world where if you don’t follow the safety protocols, you could die. 

Meanwhile, restaurant workers are expected to maintain that illusion of magic by grinning and bearing it. Ni recounts her time as a captain at Blue Hill at Stone Barns in upstate New York, where she would laugh in a specific way if a table was bothering her. Her fellow employees got the message, but customers were none-the-wiser. Jeffrey says he has now taken to crying in his car on his breaks, “just to make sure everybody else stays happy.” 

The American approach to dining is very individualistic. It is about what the diner wants, when they want it. It does not matter what is happening at the restaurant, which in many ways is a choreography as precarious as a set of spinning plates. It does not matter that there are other diners with needs, too. There is a belief the rules apply to everyone else, except them. “It’s a continual championing of the individual,” writes Priya Basil in her 2020 book, Be My Guest. “The hospitality industry thrives on the message that you are the only one who counts: you should come first, your every need considered and catered to. You deserve it, after all, as long as you can pay.” 

That final sentence is a damning indictment of the power structures in American hospitality. “Money does something to people, where this version of entitlement means that they can buy anything, literally anything, like respect and freedom,” says de Leon.

Blackman once had a customer try to bribe her with over $500 for a table because he had lied to his wife about getting a reservation at the restaurant, which is booked out months ahead of time. He believed his money should put him ahead of customers who tried multiple times before finally securing a table𠅊nd there are restaurants that would have given in. 

Customers also wield their power through tipping. Though a number of people are advocating for the restaurant industry to finally rid itself of an antiquated system that is rooted in slavery and perpetuates harassment, it is still the most common system. Servers and other front-of-house staff are paid at a subminimum wage, which is often around $2 an hour, with the idea that tips from customers would make up the rest of their salaries. “You can’t buy a sandwich with that money … you can barely buy a Coke,” says de Leon. Instead, front-of-house staff must attempt to accommodate every guest&aposs whim, because they might not get paid otherwise. Customers demand perfection, even though restaurants are run by human beings, and each mistake comes at a cost. 

Every person I spoke to had multiple tipping horror stories to share. Abigail says a table once ordered $200 of food but gave her a $5 tip due to a small miscommunication with the kitchen that resulted in a delayed order. Hutson recalls the time a middle-aged couple came into the restaurant and placed an order for a heavily modified pasta and pizza with the server. When the bill arrived, the couple became irate and demanded the pasta be taken off of the check because they claimed to have never ordered it, even though they had eaten it, and if the restaurant didn’t comply, they would take it out of the server’s tip. Hutson comped the order, so as not to affect her server’s income, but the incident felt like a punch in the gut. 

Jeffrey remembers witnessing a coworker, a single mother, wait on a table when the restaurant had first re-opened during the pandemic. Management had strict rules that all food was to be served on disposable plates for sanitation purposes. The table ordered nearly $300 worth of food, but tipped his coworker nothing because “they weren’t given proper plates and silverware.”

“It’s very insulting when people don’t tip you because most of them don’t realize what we go through behind closed doors to get the food to your table, especially during the pandemic,” Jeffrey says. “They don’t realize that the $20 you leave on my table, at this point, means everything to me. It’s how I survive.” 

De Leon says that customers are constantly deducting mistakes or disappointments from a server&aposs tips instead of speaking to management about what they wish was fixed. 𠇊 dish wasn’t great, so instead of leaving 20 percent, maybe you leave 18 or 15,” he explains. “The part that people forget is that these tiny, tiny choices add up to something so consequential—someone&aposs livelihood.” But guests are rarely burdened with that consideration because they get to leave and go home. 

Often, customers will take to platforms like Yelp to complain about their experiences. These sites have only served to bolster the power that customers have. Siker remains frustrated to this day with the first review left on her restaurant&aposs Yelp page. It was opening weekend and her team was understaffed, she recalls, but they were profusely apologetic about it and even offered customers gift cards. Someone left them a two-star review, which then turned into the restaurant’s entire rating. “We are a new restaurant that opened in the middle of pandemic, and this review is still reflecting on us two months later.” 

Friel says sites like Yelp are “vultures,” and finds it ridiculous that you can post on these platforms with zero experience and affect people’s businesses. “There is no real path for recourse,” she notes. But what upsets her the most about these platforms is that it can cost people their jobs. “I remember being a server and having a review written about me,” Friel recalls. “My name was in it and half of it was lies, and I just remember thinking, ‘Holy shit, I could lose my job.’” Luckily Friel had an understanding manager, but that is not always the case. Liz says that the corporate offices of her restaurant look at bad reviews as a sign that staff did something wrong. “We are always held accountable for the volatile entitled guest,” he says. “It creates a culture of fear.” 

There needs to be a re-imagining of what it means to be a restaurant guest—with an added emphasis placed on “guest.” Restaurants are welcoming diners into their spaces. Most service workers I spoke with considered the restaurant to be a “house” in many ways. When you go over to a person’s house for dinner, when they invite you into their personal space, there are expectations that you place on yourself as a guest, says de Leon. You try to be on your best behavior, you appreciate and respect the food that is in front of you, and you don’t complain about your seat. “You hope that at the end of it, you would get invited again to that same space,” he says. So why don’t customers see restaurants that way? 

It’s a matter of respect many diners don’t see hospitality jobs as “real” professions. “People see it as a part-time job, and not a real career,” says the server in Arizona. 𠇋ut I have been working in the industry for over 20 years.” 

“I think the way they treat us just goes to show that they don’t respect our jobs,” says Abigail. �use they don’t think this is a legitimate job, they think of themselves as better than us.” She says she has been asked multiple times what she actually wants to do with her life. 

Liz says customers have written things like “get a real job” on the tip line of receipts. “They think these jobs are just for young kids or people paying their way through college,” she says. “I’m like, 𠆎xcuse me?’ A lot of us have mortgages. We have families. We operate extremely professionally.” She rages at the idea that service work is somehow unskilled work. �n you navigate the psychological minefield of waiting tables while executing a dozen other tasks?” 

“We often have to act as a psychologist and a sommelier and be great at multitasking and time management to do this job,” adds Abigail. “You can definitely tell the difference between someone who is just doing this temporarily, and someone who sees this as a career.” 

“The hospitality industry is something people dedicate their lives to around the world, but it’s not seen that way here, even if we have dedicated our lives to it.”

The lack of respect for hospitality jobs as “legitimate” professions is very American, posits Mar. “If you left more than a couple of Euros as a tip at a nice dinner in Paris, they would be upset, because there, being a server is seen as a legitimate profession, an honorable profession.” If you go to Japan, she adds, it’s not uncommon for sushi chefs to spend nine years training before they are even allowed to touch the rice. “The hospitality industry is something people dedicate their lives to around the world, but it’s not seen that way here, even if we have dedicated our lives to it.” 

Not only is the profession not seen as “real,” but the people who work these jobs are not often seen as human, either. “People think severs aren’t people,” says Jeffrey. “We have opinions, we have emotions, and words do hurt us.” Customers act like a server’s personal boundaries don’t exist or matter, says Liz. “They always expect us to sacrifice our comfort and dignity in the name of making money.”

Hospitality workers are struggling now more than ever before. Last month, Jeffrey made just $400, and his savings have all but evaporated. He is worried that his car, which is on its last legs, might break down. He doesn’t have money for repairs—he barely has enough to pay his bills and feed himself. 

“I’ve been living off frozen food,” he says. “I just pray and try to stay positive.” But it’s hard to do that when his last two pay checks were $67 and $43, respectively. He is far from alone: A new report from One Fair Wage says that over 80 percent of hospitality workers have seen a decline in tips, and 40 percent have seen an increase in sexual harassment since the pandemic started. 

The server in Arizona is currently moonlighting as a DoorDash driver, to make up for fewer shifts and unpredictable wages. He says that some nights she makes $500, but on others just $75. Liz estimates that she is making less than a third of what she used to as a 20-year veteran of the industry. “It used to be easier to put up with whatever,” she says. 𠇋ut now we are barely making any money.” The mental health toll on restaurant workers has been enormous, as well. De Leon says people used to show up early for their shifts answering phones at the restaurant. Now, less than an hour before they are supposed to start, they are still in bed. 

Hospitality workers have been forced to become essential workers during this pandemic, not because they actually are, but because customers want to dine out. It is a luxury, not a necessity, to be served and waited on. Hospitality workers, on the other hand, need to come in. This is the only way they can pay their bills and keep food on the table, which many are barely able to do.

“The fact that restaurant workers are being considered as essential workers is mind-blowing to me,” says Blackman. “We are working the same hours as doctors and nurses, but we are not saving lives. We’re just here to be a luxury service for people who want to escape𠅋ut that comes at our own demise.”  

The pandemic has cast a harsh light on the fractured foundations of the American hospitality model, a pillar of which is this notion that the customer is always right. It’s become abundantly clear that the industry needs to stop prioritizing the wants of customers over the wellbeing of its staff. “Owners really need to rethink the idea of what hospitality is, starting with their staff,” says Friel. “[A]ll of this preaching about hospitality for others doesn’t work if your staff is miserable and being abused all the time.” 

A happier staff also means happier customers, says de Leon. 𠇊 restaurant needs to provide a safety, happy, warm environment for its employees first for customers to have an amazing time.” Blackman notes that a staff-first mentality benefits everyone. “Once you do a staff first mentality they will run your restaurant for you better than you could run your restaurant yourself.” A restaurant that does not put its staff first, ultimately, is not running a sustainable model. 

Most of the people interviewed for this story believe that tipping should be eliminated, if restaurants want to center the wellbeing of their staff. 

“Gone are the days of this Disneyland, give-me-everything era of hospitality. We need to use the word ‘no’ more, and customers need to understand that just because we can’t offer what you want doesn’t mean that we are fighting against you.”

“Tipping is unfair,” says Liz. “It perpetuates racism, it perpetuates sexual harassment, and it allows guests and owners to weaponize your wage.” Friel believes that eliminating tipping would also go a long way in getting customers to understand what dining actually costs, and what labor is actually worth, perhaps curbing customer entitlement in the process. Abigail is less optimistic. She worries that entitled customers will act even more entitled if tipping is eliminated because “we are getting paid the same, no matter how they behave.” 

The most necessary and urgent change that is needed, however, is the introduction of the word “no” into the American hospitality lexicon. “Gone are the days of this Disneyland, give-me-everything era of hospitality,” says de Leon. “We need to use the word ‘no’ more, and customers need to understand that just because we can’t offer what you want doesn’t mean that we are fighting against you.” 

“If there is anything the pandemic has taught us, it is that guests are not used to being told &aposno,&apos” says Liz. “It rocks their world every time. But they need to get used to hearing &aposno.&apos”

Restaurants also need to give their servers agency to not always say "yes." “Owners need to stop entertaining a customer’s every request,” she adds. “Guests need to realize they are not the center of the universe, and just because they are paying for this experience it does not mean the rest of the world has to fall down and die because they wanted a birthday dinner.”

Blackman believes that restaurants should operate like a “hospitable dictatorship.” “The idea is that yes, we want you to be here. Yes, we want you to have a great time. But yes, it’s also not going to be at the expense of others,” she says. “So if you start becoming violent with your words, your energy, or you start becoming aggressive as a customer, then we might have to close up our agreement with you.” 

It’s about putting your foot down and being okay with letting paying customers walk out the door if they are entitled, says Mar. “That money is not worth it. No amount of money can replace your dignity as a human being, and you shouldn’t have to put up with that type of behavior.” 

Friel says that the pandemic has shown that the customers that are most important to her business are those from the local community. They are the people who not only tip well, but also regularly check in, bringing flowers and sweet notes to the staff.

𠇌ompare this to the one-off customers who I have never seen before,” she says. “I don’t need or want their money if they are rude.” Instead, Friel says she would rather spend her time finding ways to support her community. “The regulars are the people I will bend over backwards for happily,” she says. �use they treat us with respect.” 

“We are tired, we have experienced death, some of us have lost our homes, many of us are losing our minds.”

Mar says she has had some “truly incredible customers” throughout the pandemic, but that it is unfortunately not the norm. “I even go over and thank them for being so amazing because they are so rare,” she says. “They are unfortunately the smaller percentage of people.” 

Instead, the majority of customers have used the pandemic as an excuse to tip less and demand more. Jeffrey wishes customers understood that hospitality workers are going through the same pandemic, too. “We are tired, we have experienced death, some of us have lost our homes, many of us are losing our minds,” he says. But at this point, he would just be happy if customers were kinder. 

“Please, just be nice. Even if you don’t tip me … just be nice.” 


Questions

We've prepared a list of answers to your most frequently asked questions to help you navigate FoodNetwork.com and learn more about our television programming and website!

To fully appreciate and enjoy all of features available on the Food Network website, we have optimized our site for modern, web standards based browsers such as Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari and Internet Explorer 9 and higher. While the website also works with other browsers, users may not enjoy the most enhanced experience and certain applications will not function as intended.

We also support video for both HTML5 and Adobe Flash Player 9 and higher. If you do not currently have Flash downloaded on your computer, you may download it for free at the Adobe website.

Click on the links below to go directly to your area of interest:

FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE

The Food Network is very fortunate to have Hearst Communications as our partner for publishing and distributing the Food Network Magazine.

While we at Food Network do not have access to subscription or billing information, the Customer Service Department at Hearst Communications will be very happy to assist with any questions you may have. You can reach them toll-free at 1-866-587-4653 for help with your subscription status, payments, billing, cancellation, address change, back issues, missing issues, gift subscriptions or just general questions.

You can also manage your account online from their customer service page:

Food Network Magazine Customer Service page:
Click Here

Learn more about our Food Network Magazine or order a subscription to the FOOD NETWORK MAGAZINE.

To begin, you must first sign up and REGISTER for a My Recipe Box account. Once registered, you can save recipes, rate recipes as well as submit recipe reviews. The Sign Up link is located in the upper right corner of all FoodNetwork.com pages. (If you already have an account, just log in and start adding recipes to your Recipe Box.)

Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email. You will need to follow the directions in the email in order to verify your account. (If you don't receive the email, you will need to check your Spam/Junk folder or try to log in and wait for the prompt to request a resend of the email.

Once logged in, you can access your Recipe Box by selecting it in the upper right-hand corner, and selecting "Recipes" or "Shopping List" from the drop-down menu.

After you have registered and/or signed in, you may save recipes to your Recipe Box by clicking the Save icon next to the recipe (that looks like a ribbon). The recipe will appear in your "All" folder within your Recipe Box. You then can use your Recipe Box to create folders, organize recipes, add personal recipes and share saved recipes with friends. At this time, when you save a recipe, you will not be prompted to select a specific folder. After saving the recipe, you may then add it to a folder by viewing your Recipe Box, hovering over that recipe and clicking on the folder icon.

General Tips on Using the Recipe Box:

  • To change email or password, sign in to your account, then select Account Settings from the dropdown list next to your profile name. In the left column of the My Settings page, select My Account to change your email address. To change any of your other information, such as Profile, Picture, Password or Notifications, click on the respective links and follow the steps to update your information.
  • Removing recipes from the main folder of All will permanently delete the recipe from your recipe box, including all subfolders.
  • Removing recipes from subfolders does not permanently delete the recipe from your recipe box it only removes it from the subfolder.
  • Some recipes are classified as 'restricted' and are only available online for a limited amount of time due to contractual reasons. Recipes with this status are indicated on the recipe. Restricted recipes will automatically expire from the Recipe Box without notice. For these limited-time-only recipes, we recommend that you print the recipe for future use, since it may not be available the next time you return.
  • There are three dynamically-created folders that are accessible (folders that you did not create). These are "My Personal Recipes" (recipes you created), "My Notes" (recipes that you have added personal notes to) and "In Shopping List" (recipes that are currently a part of your shopping list. You are not manually able to add or remove recipes from these folders they are added and removed based on the aforementioned criteria.
  • You may switch back and forth from the grid and list view by selecting the appropriate icons.

How to Sort Within the Recipe Box

Once logged in to your Recipe Box, you may select a specific folder in the Folder Drop-Down section, or you may leave it on the default of “All”.

Once the folder subset is selected, you may then click the arrow next to “SORT BY: Date Added” to adjust what you’re sorting by (Date Added, Favorites, A-Z, Cook Time).


How to Search Within the Recipe Box

There is a search box in the top right corner of the recipe box where you can type the name of an ingredient and click the magnifying glass icon to search.

Results will display any recipe that has the search term in the title highlighted in grey text, as well as an orange layover text if the search term is in the ingredients. For example, searching for "apple" will show you all recipes that contain "apple" as an ingredient, with specifics on each recipe.

If you are unable to find a specific ingredient, make sure that you've not misspelled it or pluralized it. For example, searching for "apples" (with an S) may return "no results". To remove the search text, simply click the red X next to the ingredient at the top left of your recipe box.

When hovering over a recipe in your box, the following icons will appear. You may click to select them to complete various actions.

Printing Recipes in Internet Explorer

If you are unable to see the Print or Save icons and you are using the Internet Explorer browser, you may need to reset your browser.

To do so, open up Internet Explorer (please note that versions 9 and above are currently supported), and select the Tools icon in the upper right corner that looks like a gear.

Then, select Internet Options.

When the pop-up box shows, select "Advanced" and click "Reset" (this will be under Reset Internet Explorer Settings, not Restore Advanced Settings).


Finally, restart your computer and check to see if you can access your print and save icons. If you're still having issues, please Contact Us.

To search for recipes in general, type your keyword into the search box at the top of any page and click the "Search" button. You can search for an ingredient (chicken, beef, pasta, etc.), a type of dish (casserole, meatloaf, cookie, etc.) or a Food Network talent (Rachael Ray, Guy Fieri, Alton Brown, etc.). Be as general or specific as you like. You will receive a full list of recipes, episodes, articles, videos, etc., associated with that keyword.

On the search results page, to narrow your results, click "Recipes" at the top of the page (next to "All", hightlighted in green). Then, directly under "Recipes," a line will appear with options to refine your results, such as "chef" or "ingredient".

When viewing a recipe, you can access the action icons on the left-hand rail.

If you are on Firefox or Chrome and zoomed in, or on an iPad, you may see the icons below the recipe.

Iconography in Recipes

When hovering over a recipe when searching the site, the following icons will appear. You may click to select them to complete various actions.

LOCATE A RECIPE SEEN ON AIR

There are several ways to locate a recipe seen on air. Here are the three most popular ways to navigate our site.

  1. Using the PROGRAM GUIDE, you can choose the date or time of day to navigate to a show and the available recipes from recently aired programs.
  2. You can also visit our SHOWS page to locate the show from which the recipe came. Hover over the "Shows" tab, select "Shows A-Z", choose the show of interest to launch the show page for the series. You can then locate recently aired or upcoming episodes and recipes featured on the program near the lower section of the page.

Information for shows that air on Food Network Canada is not available on this website, but can be found on the Food Network Canada website.

A "limited time" recipe is, for legal reasons, only available shortly before and for two weeks following the airing of an episode in which the recipe appeared. Many recipes in the database – from shows and other sources – are available on the site at all times. They will be there when you return the following week or month. But if a recipe you like is marked "limited time," please print out the recipe for future use, since it may not be available the next time you return.

RECIPE ARTICLES VERSUS RECIPES

There are two types of recipes on our site: Articles and actual recipes. Articles have been written by our editorial team and are not able to be saved to the recipe box, but they can be emailed and shared socially. Often, photo galleries contain these types of recipes. You can access the action icons on the left-hand rail.

If you are on Firefox or Chrome and zoomed in, or on an iPad, you may see the icons above the article.

Additionally, the actual recipe is often available below the article. Click “Get the Recipe” for more information.

PARTICIPATE IN A FOOD NETWORK SHOW

The Food Network continually works with numerous production companies when we are searching for audience input for future episodes. To view those production companies currently seeking location suggestions for a show, audience input and/or participation, a message will be listed on both the TV Show Page for that series (for those series that are returning) as well as the Get Cast: How to Be on Food Network page.

This page is updated frequently and is entirely based upon when production companies go back into the studios for taping. If the show you are interested in is not listed, it simply means the show is not seeking participants at this time. But do check back to the TV Show Pages or the Be On Food Network page from time to time for the latest updates.

We also currently do not have tickets for show tapings available to the general public. The Food Network is located at Chelsea Market in New York City. Although we don't offer studio tours, you might find this one-stop, NYC culinary food shop, gourmet lover's wholesale-retail wonder world of interest. For additional information on scheduled events, food, groceries and gifts, check the market's website at Chelsea Market.

CONTACTING FOOD NETWORK TALENT

Unfortunately, the schedules for our Food Network talent do not permit them to personally respond to individual questions, and to respect their privacy, we do not share their personal contact information and correspondence is not forwarded. You may consider using your favorite search engine to determine if the talent has their own personal website to which you can write or send an email directly to them.

EMPLOYMENT AND INTERNSHIPS

To view current job and internship opportunities within the Scripps Networks Interactive family, which includes HGTV, Food Network, DIY Network, Cooking Channel, Travel Channel and Great American Country, please click here to access the Careers link on the Scripps Networks Interactive website.

MOBILE APPS – General Tips for Food Network Apps

  1. Audio - If you aren’t able to hear the videos, chances are that this is the Soft Mute feature. Beginning with iOS 4, Apple changed the little button next to the volume to be a mute button like it is on the iPhone. The orientation lock is now handled in software (double-click the home button and then swipe left). Try sliding the button up or slide toward you (located above the volume controls). If this doesn't resolve your issue, go to "general settings" and confirm that the side switch is set from rotation to mute.
  2. Audio With No Video - With the newer version of the apps, we are using adaptive bitrate streaming to optimize the video experience for the user, so utilizing WiFi will ensure you are able to watch the video to the fullest extent. Try enabling that feature while connected to a network to resolve your issue.
  3. Access to Video Outside US - Currently, the Food Network website and the apps only offer video content to site visitors and app users in the U.S. and its territories due to content licensing restrictions.
  4. Low Memory Message - Often times, users experience a “low memory” error because of other applications running in the background. In these instances, applications have not been completely shut down, and because this app requires large amounts of memory to run, other applications need to be completely closed. On the iPhone or iPad, this can be done by double-clicking on the home button when logged into the application. A tab of applications along the bottom will appear and allow you to swipe left and/or right to show which applications are currently running and using memory. Touch and hold any application icon until the icons start to wiggle. Tap the "x" in the corner of the application you want to close. For more information visit Apple Support. On Android devices, try going into the "Managing Apps" category and clearing your cache, then restarting your device.
  5. App Quits Unexpectedly or Won’t Launch - Try a hard restart on your device. On the iPhone or iPad, hold down the top Lock Button and the Home button until you see the Apple logo. This will take a few seconds. In the meantime, ignore the "slide to power off" prompt – just keep holding those buttons down until you see the Apple logo. Once the device has restarted, try launching the app again (make certain you are connected to WiFi or 3G) to see if you still receive the error message. If the restart doesn't work, try to reinstall the app. Make certain that you are connected to WiFi, LTE, or 3G as the app will not work otherwise. Touch and hold any application icon on the Home screen until the icons start to wiggle. Tap the "x" in the corner of the application you want to remove. You may be prompted to rate the application. Tap Delete to remove the application and all of its data from your device. Press the Home button to cancel or stop deleting apps. Open the App Store on your device and locate the application to reinstall. Tap the price and then "Buy." If prompted, enter your iTunes Store account information. If you previously bought the application, you are prompted to download it again for free. Tap “OK” and the app will download and install the application. After the application is installed, your issue should be resolved.

Food Network IN THE KITCHEN (ITK) App:

  • Recipes cannot be removed from My Recipe Box nor can new folders be added through the app. However, you can easily make additions and revisions to the Recipe Box from the Food Network website.
  • ITK is currently only available for iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire, and some Android handsets and devices. We hope to be able to make an announcement shortly regarding availability on other tablets and devices.

Food Network ON THE ROAD (OTR) App:

  • Location listings within the app are updated the last time the location was verified. Verifying hundreds of locations that have been featured over the years takes time and unfortunately, not everything is caught. If we are not informed by the restaurant themselves, it definitely can take time for an update to appear. Please use the Contact Us feature to submit an update or inaccuracy.
  • Roadtrips and Favorites do sync between devices via iCloud. If you’re having trouble with this feature, it could be that iCloud has not been set up on one of the devices, or the devices are logged into different iCloud accounts.
  • If you are on an Android device and receive a “package error” when trying to download the app, navigate to Settings and then select Applications. Open all applications/manage applications and then move onto Google Play Store. Clear Data and clear Cache and see if this resolves your issue. If not, you may need to uninstall Play Store updates, log out and log back into your Google Play account.
  • OTR is currently available for iPhone, iPad, and Android handsets. We hope to be able to make an announcement shortly regarding availability on other tablets and devices.

WATCH FOOD NETWORK (TV Everywhere) App:

  • We currently partner with the following Cable/Satellite Providers: Comcast Xfinity, Brighthouse Networks, AT&T Uverse, Cablevision's Optimum, DirecTV, and Time Warner. To access the content, log in to the app with your credentials for the above providers. (Please note that you do have to subscribe to the television portion, not just the phone or Internet). If you don't have the Food Network in your current lineup or don't subscribe to cable services, don't worry, you can click the "My provider is not listed" option on the Login screen and we will display only video content that does not require login. Without logging in, you'll still have access to a good amount of video content including an average of 25 hours of full episodes at one time!
  • To locate videos within the app, select SHOWS and select the show you are interested in (based on those that are available). Once the show appears, you will see a box above the videos that will show Season. Click into this box and select ALL. The unlocked videos are usually the last few within the list.
  • Updates to CUPCAKES are made after on-air episode seasons have completed. For instance, our most recent version of the app was implemented after the Cupcake Champions season finale was completed. As new seasons begin and end, future updates will be released. Stay tuned!
  • Printing is not available with the current version of the CUPCAKES app. We are aware of the desire for printing capabilities and are considering that feature for the future. Of course, with an iPad, a user can always take a screenshot and email that image to a printer.
  • If you are having difficulty with video playback, or videos stop playing in mid-stream, please double-check your wireless connection since these videos stream online and are not embedded in the app (to save space on your device).
  • Orientation of the CUPCAKE app does not rotate to Portrait mode. The app was designed only for landscape orientation and will not rotate to portrait mode.
  • CUPCAKES app requires a lot of local memory power from the device. Problems such as the app freezing or links not working may occur when the battery power is running low. Usually, if you swipe off of the screen that you are on, then navigate back to it, performance should improve. Otherwise, try closing the app and re-opening it. That frequently solves most performance problems. Also, using the app when the battery power is high also improves performance.

FOOD NETWORK NEWSLETTERS

To subscribe to one of our newsletters, change your email address or unsubscribe from one of our newsletters, visit our FOOD NETWORK NEWSLETTERS page. We have also made it convenient for you to subscribe to our family of networks newsletters and hope to see you as a subscriber in the near future.

Food Network appreciates your interest in suggesting ideas, but we only accept series and specials proposals only from television production companies with national or major market production credentials. If you are a production company, please send us your credentials and a history of your production experience only. After reviewing them, Food Network will determine whether or not to send you a release form with a request for further information. DO NOT send any pitch ideas or proposals as they will be returned unread. Please send your company's credentials to:

Food Network
75 Ninth Avenue
NY NY 10011
Attention: Submissions New Show Proposals

QUESTION REGARDING A PROGRAM RECENTLY WATCHED ON AIR

All programs seen on air are represented on our website. Navigating to the show page for the program seen on air will lead you to all information made available to us about an episode. The quickest way to navigate to a show page is by using the program guide which is accessible from the homepage by selecting Recipes on TV tab. Then choose the date watched from the calendar to view a comprehensive list of shows that aired on that date, as well as accessibility to the recipes and resources made available to us for each episode.

MERCHANDISE, COOKBOOKS, DVDs

Visit the Food Network Store to purchase kitchenware, cookbooks, and DVDs from many of our popular shows. Food Network-branded kitchenware is exclusively available at Kohl's stores and Kohls.com

TIPS FOR VIEWING ONLINE VIDEOS

Our website is optimized for the modern web standards based browsers such as current versions of Firefox, Safari, Chrome, and Internet Explorer 9 and higher. While the website also works with some other browsers, users may not enjoy the most enhanced experience.

We support video for Adobe Flash Player 9 and higher. If you do not currently have Flash downloaded on your computer, you may download it for free at the Adobe website.

Video is also supported using HTML5 on handsets and tablets without Adobe Flash Player.

QUESTION NOT ADDRESSED ON THIS HELP PAGE

To send a question about our TV programs, their recipes, or our website, please visit our Contact Us and submit your inquiry using the available webform. Please be as specific as possible when completing the form to assist us with answering your question.


Job Opportunities

About Essential Earth Farm: We are a women-owned, sustainable urban farm on a journey to return humans to their symbiotic and cyclical relationship with the natural world. We’re starting from the ground up with the “. read more

Job Title: Urban Farm Intern in Stamford, CT

About Essential Earth Farm: We are a women-owned, sustainable urban farm on a journey to return humans to their symbiotic and cyclical relationship with the natural world. We’re starting from the ground up with the “essentials” to sustaining life and thriving ecosystems on our planet - Flora, Mushrooms, and Soil. Join us in our effort to make our world a little bit better by returning circularity to our food system.

Working on our Urban Farm:

● Interns will gain in-person experience and lesson-based learning in all aspects of planting, growing and maintaining a diversified, sustainable microgreen & mushroom operation

● Managing composting, planting, watering, and harvesting operations

● Keeping and logging crop records / data management

● Cleaning and sanitizing grow trays, tools and farm equipment

● Preparing for and attending farmer’s markets and community events

● Attending professional development field trips (Covid-19 pending) to learn about other farms and food-justice work going on in the Stamford area

Skills and Experience:

● Strong interest in expanding farming, food-systems and food-justice knowledge and skills

● Hard worker with the physical ability to lift 25+ lbs and kneel/crouch for extended periods of time. Previous garden experience is not necessary

● Prepared to adapt to the ever-changing priorities of the farm

● Good communication and interpersonal skills with people of all ages

● Positive attitude and a good sense of humor

● Ability to learn, ask questions, take initiative, to work both with and without direct supervision

● Demonstrates commitment, reliability, punctuality, and responsible behavior

● Act as a positive role model to volunteers and others working on the farm

● Ability to follow the farm’s COVID safety procedures and precautions to keep ourselves and the community safe

To Apply: Email your resume and cover letter to Casey Keefe at [email protected] with “Urban Farm Intern” in the subject line.

At Essential Earth Farm LLC we value all employees and job candidates as unique individuals, and we welcome the variety of experiences they bring to our company. As such, we have a strict non-discrimination policy. We believe everyone should be treated equally regardless of race, sex, gender identification, sexual orientation, national origin, native language, religion, age, disability, marital status, citizenship, genetic information, pregnancy, or any other characteristic protected by law. We encourage everyone to apply!

Administrative Coordinator

Down to Earth Market is looking for an Administrative Coordinator who will report to the President while working closely with the rest of our office and field teams. You will be responsible for collecting information, maintaining databases, and creating reports while overseeing the movement of paperwork, supplies and equipment, and money. On days when our farmers markets are open, you will provide phone support to our site management team and to shoppers. Your ability to apply your data management, organizational, business software, and problem-solving skills to any project put in front of you will ensure that you excel in this role.

This is a full -time, remote position although workspace is available in our Ossining office . The regular work week will be Thursday through Monday. The required work hours on Friday, Saturday and Sunday are 7am to 3pm EST, when our farmers markets are open.

A capable bookkeeper, facile with Quickbooks , MS Excel and database software.

Familiar with inventory management techniques and able to manage and coordinate deployment of market supplies and equipment.

Knowledgeable about business processes, especially administrative management, accounts receivable, accounts payable, managing HR functions , customer interactions, and scheduling.

Ab le to schedule and track timely dissemination of information and timely delivery of materials, identifying potential issues that may disrupt work schedules and finding solutions. The ability to produce timely progress reports is important.

Confident in supervising a part-time staff person who will move and deploy equipment and materials .

Effective in verbal and written communication.

Focused, highly organized, detail oriented, with superior follow through. Collaborative by nature and always looking ahead.

A planner who executes and coordinates tasks and activity without ever losing sight of goals and deadlines.

Analytical and a problem-solver comfortable with collecting and formatting information to be shared with different audiences.

Personable on the phone efficient in responding to support requests from colleagues, and information requests from the public.

Familiar with Microsoft business suite (Excel, Word, Outlook, Teams) where we do our business work and internal communications but also able to quickly grasp specialized software applications including CRM and event management.

Apply by emailing your resume and a cover letter to [email protected] .

Rye Farmers Market Manager

Rye Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Rye Farmers Market on Sundays from 7:30am-3pm located in Rye on Theodore Fremd Avenue directly behind the Purchase St stores with additional flexible hours outside of market day for flyering and c. read more

Rye Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Rye Farmers Market on Sundays from 7:30am-3pm located in Rye on Theodore Fremd Avenue directly behind the Purchase St stores with additional flexible hours outside of market day for flyering and community engagement opportunities.

The Farmers Market Manager oversees day-to-day operations of one of our seasonal, outdoor farmers markets in New York City or Westchester County. The manager is Down to Earth Markets' on-site representative, working closely with the company's office team to help ensure the market's success and spearhead interactions with market vendors, shoppers and the community. The Market Manager should cultivate a sense of ownership of their Farmer’s Market through:

  • Supervising and managing daily operations to assure a smooth and safe running market
  • Enforcing market rules and regulations
  • Collecting and reporting market data and success metrics
  • Setting up and breaking down the market manager tent and market signage
  • Selling farmers market branded items
  • Taking initiative and serving as a market host to welcome and engage shoppers, promoting good relations between vendors, our company, and the shoppers as a representative of Down to Earth Markets. Assisting shoppers and vendors with use of food access and nutrition programs (SNAP, FMNP).
  • Engaging with shoppers and vendors to report successes, concerns and opportunities to Down to Earth Markets.
  • Representing the farmers market at community events and through flyering distributions.
  • Attending weekly conference calls with fellow managers and your Operations Manager

Physical / logistical requirements:

  • Able to lift and carry up to 50 pounds.
  • Able to walk and stand for several hours at a time.
  • Able to work in all weather conditions, e.g. heat, cold, rain, sun, wind, snow.
  • Complete two days of shadowing in conjunction with market opening dates.
  • Complete the required flyering shifts in advance of the markets’ opening date and during the course of the season.
  • Arrive 1 ½ hours before the market start time to lead market set up and stay at least one hour past closing time to oversee breakdown, load out and clean up.
  • Communicate regularly with Operations and Marketing to ensure a steady flow of information between the office and the markets.
  • Read weekly Site Manager Update, Shopper Email and other occasional communications.
  • Receive and reply to last minute market updates relayed via e-mail, text or phone.
  • Respond in a timely manner to communications from the office.
  • Have use of a smartphone that can install and use Microsoft Teams and ADP Mobile for market-day communications and to post to Facebook.
  • Access to your own vehicle with valid driver's license is a plus.


Available to start immediately

In order to apply, please email your cover letter and resume to [email protected] and answer the following question:

What would it mean to you to be a farmers market manager?

British Food Salesperson - NYC

Simple Fine Foods (Not Posh Nosh!)

British Pub Pies, Spreads, and Sauces

We’re looking for outgoing individuals who enjoy meeting other fun-loving foodies at Farmer’s Markets. Our Traditional British Pub Pie. read more

Simple Fine Foods (Not Posh Nosh!)

British Pub Pies, Spreads, and Sauces

We’re looking for outgoing individuals who enjoy meeting other fun-loving foodies at Farmer’s Markets. Our Traditional British Pub Pies are extremely popular and we are experiencing Enormous Growth!

Be a part of the “British Invasion”!
Shepherd’s Pie, Steak and Ale Pie, Cornish Pasty, Scotch Eggs, and more!

Morningside Park Farmer’s Market
110th St. and Manhattan Ave in NYC Saturdays 9-3p.m. thru December

Chelsea Farmer’s Market
23rd St. Between 9th and 8th Aves in NYC Saturdays 9-3p.m. May thru December

Cunningham Park Farmer’s Market
19600 Union Tpke, Queens
Sundays from May thru December

So let us know if this sounds fun by e-mailing a brief description of your background, or a

simple resume to:[email protected]
Place “British Invasion” in the subject line and we’ll get to it right away.

**Must have a car or access to a car
Oh, and the pay is pretty good too!

Cake Salesperson - Westchester, Brooklyn

Clarkson Avenue Crumb Cake Company makes delicious crumb cakes in a variety of flavors and sizes. We are a small but growing company that is looking to expand its presence at farmers markets in New York.

We have job openings at the Larchmont. read more

Clarkson Avenue Crumb Cake Company makes delicious crumb cakes in a variety of flavors and sizes. We are a small but growing company that is looking to expand its presence at farmers markets in New York.

We have job openings at the Larchmont Farmers Market (Westchester County), McGolrick Farmers Market (Brooklyn), and the Park Slope Farmers Market (Brooklyn) in New York. The Larchmont Farmers Market is open on Saturdays from 8:30am-1pm from late April through December, and the McGolrick & Park Slope Farmers Markets are both open now through December on Sundays from 10am to 3pm.

Let us know if you’re interested by e-mailing a brief description of your background, or a simple resume to: [email protected] . Please put “Farmers Market” in the subject line.

Morningside Park Farmers Market Manager

Morningside Park Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Larchmont Farmers Market on Saturdays from 8am-4pm located in Manhattan on West 110th St and Manhattan Avenue outside Morningside Park with additional flexible hours outside of m. read more

Morningside Park Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Larchmont Farmers Market on Saturdays from 8am-4pm located in Manhattan on West 110th St and Manhattan Avenue outside Morningside Park with additional flexible hours outside of market day for flyering and community engagement opportunities.

The Farmers Market Manager oversees day-to-day operations of one of our seasonal, outdoor farmers markets in New York City or Westchester County. The manager is Down to Earth Markets' on-site representative, working closely with the company's office team to help ensure the market's success and spearhead interactions with market vendors, shoppers and the community. The Market Manager should cultivate a sense of ownership of their Farmer’s Market through:

  • Supervising and managing daily operations to assure a smooth and safe running market
  • Coordinating with your fellow manager at Morningside Park to create a dynamic team to cater to vendors and the community in a timely, accommodating fashion
  • Enforcing market rules and regulations
  • Collecting and reporting market data and success metrics
  • Setting up and breaking down the market manager tent and market signage
  • Selling farmers market branded items
  • Taking initiative and serving as a market host to welcome and engage shoppers, promoting good relations between vendors, our company, and the shoppers as a representative of Down to Earth Markets. Assisting shoppers and vendors with use of food access and nutrition programs (SNAP, FMNP).
  • Engaging with shoppers and vendors to report successes, concerns and opportunities to Down to Earth Markets.
  • Representing the farmers market at community events and through flyering distributions.
  • Attending weekly conference calls with fellow managers and your Operations Manager

Physical / logistical requirements:

  • Able to lift and carry up to 50 pounds.
  • Able to walk and stand for several hours at a time.
  • Able to work in all weather conditions, e.g. heat, cold, rain, sun, wind, snow.
  • Complete two days of shadowing in conjunction with market opening dates.
  • Complete the required flyering shifts in advance of the markets’ opening date and during the course of the season.
  • Arrive 1 ½ hours before the market start time to lead market set up and stay at least one hour past closing time to oversee breakdown, load out and clean up.
  • Communicate regularly with Operations and Marketing to ensure a steady flow of information between the office and the markets.
  • Read weekly Site Manager Update, Shopper Email and other occasional communications.
  • Receive and reply to last minute market updates relayed via e-mail, text or phone.
  • Respond in a timely manner to communications from the office.
  • Have use of a smartphone that can install and use Microsoft Teams and ADP Mobile for market-day communications and to post to Facebook.
  • Access to your own vehicle with valid driver's license is a plus.


Available to start immediately

In order to apply, please email your cover letter and resume to [email protected] and answer the following question:

What would it mean to you to be a farmers market manager?

Fill-In/Floater Market Manager

Down to Earth Markets manages farmers markets in Westchester County and New York City. The company was founded in 1991 to provide economic opportunity to New York area farmers and arti. read more

Down to Earth Markets manages farmers markets in Westchester County and New York City. The company was founded in 1991 to provide economic opportunity to New York area farmers and artisan food makers to bring delicious local foods to communities in New York City and its suburbs. In 2014 Down to Earth Markets became a Certified B Corp, formalizing its mission and committing to use business as a power for making positive change in the world.

Farmers Market Fill-In Manager/Host

Part-time, $17/hour positions available at our Farmers Markets in NYC and Westchester. We are looking for an enthusiastic, personable candidate with the ability to fill-in at one or more seasonal farmers markets and assist with market promotion within those communities.

The Farmers Market Manager should cultivate a sense of ownership of their Farmer’s Market through:

- Supervising daily operations to assure a smooth and safe running market

- Enforcing market rules and regulations

- Collecting and reporting market data and success metrics

- Setting up and breaking down the market manager tent and market signage

- Selling farmers market goods

- Serving as a market host to welcome and engage shoppers, promoting good relations between vendors, our company, and the shoppers as a representative of Down to Earth Markets.

- Engaging with shoppers and vendors to report successes, concerns and opportunities to Down to Earth Markets.

- Must attend 4 days of training including 2 workwiths and 2 shadowing dates before filling-in at a market.

- Must be available to occasionally represent the farmers market at local chamber of commerce meetings, community board meetings, fairs, volunteer opportunities or other community events.

- Must be available to distribute flyers in the farmers market community several times throughout the season.
- Must be punctual
- Must be able to lift and carry 50lbs
- Must have access to a computer and smart phone for emailing, social media posting, submitting and receiving reports
- Must commit to work for the entire market season
- An interest in and ability to articulately communicate about local food and sustainable agriculture is a plus!

-English/Spanish speakers also a plus!

Available to begin immediately

Larchmont Farmer's Market Manager

Larchmont Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Larchmont Farmers Market on Saturdays from 6:30am-2pm located in the Larchmont Metro North parking lot with additional flexible hour. read more

Larchmont Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Larchmont Farmers Market on Saturdays from 6:30am-2pm located in the Larchmont Metro North parking lot with additional flexible hours outside of market day for flyering and community engagement opportunities.

The Farmers Market Manager oversees day-to-day operations of one of our seasonal, outdoor farmers markets in New York City or Westchester County. The manager is Down to Earth Markets' on-site representative, working closely with the company's office team to help ensure the market's success and spearhead interactions with market vendors, shoppers and the community. The Market Manager should cultivate a sense of ownership of their Farmer’s Market through:

  • Supervising and managing daily operations to assure a smooth and safe running market
  • Coordinating with your fellow manager at Larchmont to create a dynamic team to cater to vendors and the community in a timely, accommodating fashion
  • Enforcing market rules and regulations
  • Collecting and reporting market data and success metrics
  • Setting up and breaking down the market manager tent and market signage
  • Selling farmers market branded items
  • Taking initiative and serving as a market host to welcome and engage shoppers, promoting good relations between vendors, our company, and the shoppers as a representative of Down to Earth Markets. Assisting shoppers and vendors with use of food access and nutrition programs (SNAP, FMNP).
  • Engaging with shoppers and vendors to report successes, concerns and opportunities to Down to Earth Markets.
  • Representing the farmers market at community events and through flyering distributions.
  • Attending weekly conference calls with fellow managers and your Operations Manager

Physical / logistical requirements:

  • Able to lift and carry up to 50 pounds.
  • Able to walk and stand for several hours at a time.
  • Able to work in all weather conditions, e.g. heat, cold, rain, sun, wind, snow.
  • Complete two days of shadowing in conjunction with market opening dates.
  • Complete the required flyering shifts in advance of the markets’ opening date and during the course of the season.
  • Arrive 1 ½ hours before the market start time to lead market set up and stay at least one hour past closing time to oversee breakdown, load out and clean up.
  • Communicate regularly with Operations and Marketing to ensure a steady flow of information between the office and the markets.
  • Read weekly Site Manager Update, Shopper Email and other occasional communications.
  • Receive and reply to last minute market updates relayed via e-mail, text or phone.
  • Respond in a timely manner to communications from the office.
  • Have use of a smartphone that can install and use Microsoft Teams and ADP Mobile for market-day communications and to post to Facebook.
  • Access to your own vehicle with valid driver's license is a plus.

In order to apply, please email your cover letter and resume to [email protected] and answer the following question:

What would it mean to you to be a farmers market manager?

Pasta Salesperson

Do you love fresh pasta? La Trafila Pasta Fresca is looking for someone to help us out at our Farmers Market Locations- Park Slope, Brooklyn on Sundays and Morningside Park, Manhattan on Saturdays. Please reach out to us via email at read more

Do you love fresh pasta? La Trafila Pasta Fresca is looking for someone to help us out at our Farmers Market Locations- Park Slope, Brooklyn on Sundays and Morningside Park, Manhattan on Saturdays. Please reach out to us via email at [email protected] with your resume or related experience.

Wine Salesperson

If you see yourself as having an entrepreneurial spirit and support local agriculture, then we would like to hear from you. We are looking for someone who has a flexible schedule and is available to work . read more

If you see yourself as having an entrepreneurial spirit and support local agriculture, then we would like to hear from you. We are looking for someone who has a flexible schedule and is available to work Friday through Sunday to manage our farmers market locations starting in January 2021. Markets are located in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Westchester.

Basic requirements needed are a valid NY driver’s license and your own vehicle.

Cliffton Dry is a New York City based wine product made with apples with a focus on sustainability, quality and wellness. www.clifftondry.com

To learn more contact our Sales Manager at [email protected]

Cunningham Park Farmers Market Manager

Cunningham Park Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Cunningham Park Farmers Market on Sundays from 7:30am-3pm located in Cunningham Park off of Union Turnpike in the parking lot by the tennis courts with additional flexible hou. read more

Cunningham Park Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Cunningham Park Farmers Market on Sundays from 7:30am-3pm located in Cunningham Park off of Union Turnpike in the parking lot by the tennis courts with additional flexible hours outside of market day for flyering and community engagement opportunities.

The Farmers Market Manager oversees day-to-day operations of one of our seasonal, outdoor farmers markets in New York City or Westchester County. The manager is Down to Earth Markets' on-site representative, working closely with the company's office team to help ensure the market's success and spearhead interactions with market vendors, shoppers and the community. The Market Manager should cultivate a sense of ownership of their Farmer’s Market through:

  • Supervising and managing daily operations to assure a smooth and safe running market
  • Coordinating with your fellow manager at Cunningham Park to create a dynamic team to cater to vendors and the community in a timely, accommodating fashion
  • Enforcing market rules and regulations
  • Collecting and reporting market data and success metrics
  • Setting up and breaking down the market manager tent and market signage
  • Selling farmers market branded items
  • Taking initiative and serving as a market host to welcome and engage shoppers, promoting good relations between vendors, our company, and the shoppers as a representative of Down to Earth Markets. Assisting shoppers and vendors with use of food access and nutrition programs (SNAP, FMNP).
  • Engaging with shoppers and vendors to report successes, concerns and opportunities to Down to Earth Markets.
  • Representing the farmers market at community events and through flyering distributions.
  • Attending weekly conference calls with fellow managers and your Operations Manager

Physical / logistical requirements:

  • Able to lift and carry up to 50 pounds.
  • Able to walk and stand for several hours at a time.
  • Able to work in all weather conditions, e.g. heat, cold, rain, sun, wind, snow.
  • Complete two days of shadowing in conjunction with market opening dates.
  • Complete the required flyering shifts in advance of the markets’ opening date and during the course of the season.
  • Arrive 1 ½ hours before the market start time to lead market set up and stay at least one hour past closing time to oversee breakdown, load out and clean up.
  • Communicate regularly with Operations and Marketing to ensure a steady flow of information between the office and the markets.
  • Read weekly Site Manager Update, Shopper Email and other occasional communications.
  • Receive and reply to last minute market updates relayed via e-mail, text or phone.
  • Respond in a timely manner to communications from the office.
  • Have use of a smartphone that can install and use Microsoft Teams and ADP Mobile for market-day communications and to post to Facebook.
  • Access to your own vehicle with valid driver's license is a plus.

In order to apply, please email your resume and cover letter to [email protected] and answer the following question:

What would it mean to you to be a farmers market manager?

Chelsea Farmers Market Manager

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Chelsea Farmers Market on Saturdays from 7:30am-4pm located in Manhattan on 23rd Street between 8th and 9th Avenues with additional flexible hours outside of market day for flyering and community engagement opportun. read more

Part-time, $17/hour position available at our Chelsea Farmers Market on Saturdays from 7:30am-4pm located in Manhattan on 23rd Street between 8th and 9th Avenues with additional flexible hours outside of market day for flyering and community engagement opportunities starting in April.


The Farmers Market Manager oversees day-to-day operations of one of our seasonal, outdoor farmers markets in New York City or Westchester County. The manager is Down to Earth Markets' on-site representative, working closely with the company's office team to help ensure the market's success and spearhead interactions with market vendors, shoppers and the community. The Market Manager should cultivate a sense of ownership of their Farmer’s Market through:


ɿight for relief'

Adler alluded to comments made earlier this week by de Blasio, who appeared to suggest it may be 2021 before indoor dining is permitted again. "If folks miss the theater, if they miss the indoor dining, those things will be back. They'll be back next year at some point," de Blasio said, according to the New York Post.

"If that is actually going to be the case, then we need to know and we need to fight for relief," said Adler.

Wilson said the economic burden of not being able to offer indoor dining is felt not only by restaurant owners, it extends to the hundreds of thousands of restaurant workers who collectively make up an industry that is "the fabric of this city," she said.

In February, before the coronavirus pandemic upended daily life, roughly 324,000 people worked at bars and restaurants in New York City, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. In July, that number had fallen to just under 162,000, a decline of about 50%.

New York City had an overall unemployment rate of 20% in July, up from 4.3% last year, according to preliminary data from the state Department of Labor released Tuesday.

"The mayor has dined with us here at Melba's, so we know that he cares. He knows the importance of this. He knows that it's important for my employees to know, how are they going to pay their bills? How are we going to pay our bills?" Wilson said.

"The rent bills are still coming in. . We have 100% of the bills, fixed costs that have to be paid, however, while we're getting 20% of the income," she added.

When asked for comment, a representative from de Blasio's office directed CNBC to comments made last week by the mayor's senior advisor for public health, Dr. Jay Varma, who stressed that transmission of the coronavirus is more likely indoors than outdoors.

"And we know any place where you can't wear face protection is riskier than a place where you can, and of course when people are eating and drinking they can't wear that type of facial protection," Varma said, according to the New York Business Journal.

In an email to CNBC, Cuomo spokesman Will Burns noted that the governor relaxed rules on alcoholic drinks for carryout and delivery to support restaurants, as well as established a $100 million fund for small business loans. He also stressed that New York state would "continue to follow the science" as it navigates the economic reopening.

"Our phased reopening is focused solely on protecting public health," he wrote.


How to Write a Perfect Food Service Resume (Examples Included)

From instagrammable tasting menus to the satisfying quickness of a fast-food burger with fries, the food industry is a perennially busy one. It’s a fast-moving field, with lots of turnover and opportunities if you’re looking for one. You need to be ready when those opportunities come up, or when you’re on the hunt for a new gig. The first step should always be getting your resume in order. If yours could use a makeover, let’s look at some food service industry samples that can help guide you through your own resume revision process.

1.Restaurant server resume

2.Restaurant supervisor resume

3.Food service resume

First up is Barney, who’s looking to take his part-time jobs and volunteer experience and leverage them into his first full-time restaurant job.

Barney Barnett

99 Rose Avenue

San Jose, CA 98989

[email protected]

Enthusiastic, responsible food service professional with safe food-handling certificate, dedicated to excellent customer service

  • Outgoing personality
  • Bilingual (spanish)
  • Team player
  • Safe food handling
  • Strong customer focus

San Jose community college—food safety & handling certificate, 2016

Eastside High School—Diploma, 2015

Work Experience

Food service trainee, March 2016 – present

Busboy/dishwasher, May 2012 – March 2016

Serve as jack-of-all-trades in the kitchen and front-of-house, working with servers and building on experience as a dishwasher and busboy.

  • Serve food and assist servers as needed to provide quick and high-quality customer service
  • Set, clear, and clean tables
  • Wash dishes, and organize dishes for efficient cleaning and serving
  • Trained in using POS systems

Volunteer Experience

Helping Hands Shelter & Soup Kitchen

Server and dishwasher, September 2011 – present

  • Assist the kitchen manager with meal planning and serving
  • Serve customers during breakfast, lunch, or dinner shifts
  • Organize kitchen cleanup and conduct inventory

Barney doesn’t have any full-time experience, so he wants to frame his skills as his biggest selling point. This means he’s using a slightly different format, putting skills up front. He also uses his objective statement as a headline of sorts, giving the reader the elevator pitch of his qualifications: service-oriented personality and certification in the field. This is his first chance to showcase what he brings to his next restaurant.

For his experience, this section is short—but barney uses it to good advantage, showing that he has varied experience, working both in the kitchen and out on the serving floor. He also makes sure to include his volunteer experience, which is also kitchen-related.

Next up is Kenny, who has been working in restaurants for more than 12 years, and wants to revise his resume to take advantage of opportunities to step up.

Kenny Chapell

65 Hearth Street

Portland, ME 54545

(333) 222-0000

[email protected]

Veteran customer-focused food server with more than 15 years of experience and a strong history of revenue generation, repeat business, and top-notch service.

The Lobster Pot Portland, ME

Shift manager & server February 2010 – present

Generated more than $750,000 in sales revenue to date by leveraging knowledge of the food, wine, and cocktail menus in order to make the perfect recommendations for each customer in a busy, fast-paced restaurant environment.

  • Manage front-of-house duties, including employee scheduling and day-to-day supervision and management for a staff of 25 servers, busboys, and dishwashers.
  • Process daily sales numbers and ensure cash register accuracy.
  • Handle cash and credit transactions with total accuracy.
  • Serve customers, with a focus on following up to ensure a great customer experience and repeat business.

Bartolo’s Bistro Portland, ME
Server March 2007 – April 2010

Built and maintained customer relationships at portland’s highest-ratedFrench restaurant.

  • Provided exceptional customer service to ensure repeat business.
  • Demonstrated deep product knowledge when discussing menu options and making recommendations to customers.
  • Prioritized time management to maximize customer satisfaction and revenue generation.
  • Reconciled cash register at the beginning and end of day to verify sales.
  • Configured tip sharing for front-of-house staff.

Pizza Pete’s Portland, ME
Server Januaryry 2002 – April 2007
Dishwasher June 2006 – April 2007

Created a welcoming environment for every customer in a fast-paced, family oriented franchise of a national pizza chain.

  • Served food and drink orders quickly and accurately.
  • Maintained a clean work area and other daily shift duties.
  • Demonstrated strong teamwork and multitasking abilities.
  • Served children’s birthday parties.
  • Promoted to server after less than a year spent as a dishwasher and food service trainee.
  • Adept at operating POS systems
  • Handling customer transactions with scrupulous accuracy
  • Resolving customer and staff issues as they come up
  • Managing servers and other staff
  • Microsoft office (word, excel, powerpoint)
  • Quickbooks

Rentschler College, Portland, ME
A.S., Business Administration (in progress)

Merriweather High School, Portland, ME
High School diploma, 2008

Unlike Barney, Kenny has a lot of great restaurant serving experience, so the more traditional reverse-chronological format works well for him. Kenny is also very careful with his word choice, using attention-grabbing words like “veteran” and “revenue generation” in his objective statement to underline that experience to the reader. Word choice is so important on your resume—in a world where every job opening gets a lot of applicants, the words you choose can make the difference between an interview invite and a shuffle past—so choose wisely! Use words that emphasize how great you are, and speak to the skills and experience you want to highlight. Kenny also uses narrative to his advantage by giving a brief summary for each of his jobs to frame what he wants to emphasize in each one.

Next up we have another restaurant veteran, Kelsey, who wants to make the jump to senior management, after years of serving and floor managing.

Kelsey Choi
433 Rosa Parks Blvd, apt 4g • Birmingham, AL 21212
[email protected] • (777) 888-9999

Experienced server with demonstrated leadership experience. Proven revenue generator, specializing in repeat customer cultivation and maintenance. adept problem solver, with experience resolving customer and staff issues in house. Strong administrator, with extensive experience managing staff schedules, hiring, training, and daily accounting.

Work Experience

Floor Manager/Lead Server
BarAmericann, Birmingham, AL
October 2012 – present

Lead a team of 20 servers as front-of-house manager of popular, fast-paced fusion restaurant.

  • Use POS system to help management improve margins, ensure accurate sales reporting, manage more effectively, and develop staff revenue goals
  • Create and manage staff schedules
  • Coordinate reservations via open table and phone
  • Train front-of-house staff on serving protocols, safe food handling, and time management
  • Build a strong team through positive, proactive communication and coaching
  • Serve customers as needed, providing stellar service and encouraging repeat business
  • Promoted to manager from lead server, and from server to lead server over the course of four years

Server
Flip’s Burger Hut, Mobile, AL
March 2010 – September 2012

Provided top-notch customer service as a member of a team that saw $4 million in revenue generation.

  • Developed strong multitasking skills in a fast-paced environment while managing a constant flow of guests during lunch and dinner shifts
  • Served guests with a focus on time and revenue management, while providing excellent customer experiences
  • Trained new staff on restaurant processes and policies
  • Handled daily revenue of $1000 – $2000
  • Worked full time shifts while attending school
  • Interpersonal communication (managing customer concerns and needs, coordinating and educating staff)
  • Staff management (currently manage day-to-day operations for a front-of-house staff of 30)
  • Knowledge and application of customer habits and patterns
  • POS system management (servtech, salesapp)
  • Quickbooks pro (expert level knowledge)
  • Microsoft excel (expert level knowledge)

Alabama University
B.A., Hospitality Management, 2014

National Food Safety Board
Foodsafe handling and safety certification (Alabama)

Kelsey has a lot of information she wants to include in this resume—that means she has a lot of editing to do, to make sure that a) she’s setting the narrative she wants to set and b) she’s not overcrowding it. To do this, she needs to show her information in a very efficient way. Because she does have a lot of experience, and wants to show how multi-faceted she is a manager, she opts against the standard objective statement and instead uses a summary statement. This sets the tone of the rest of her resume, and gives her a guideline for the bullets she’ll use later, when describing her experience.

Speaking of her experience, Kelsey sticks to her narrative by listing her most relevant jobs. She may have others, but these are the ones that showcase her development as a server and manager, which is what she wants to emphasize in order to level up in that area. This way, she has room to talk about her skills, without creating an overcrowded novel of a resume.

For her skills, Kelsey doesn’t just list them—she provides brief examples or explanatory notes for each. Nothing too extensive, but enough to show the reader that she has concrete background for each. She should be prepared to discuss these in more depth (or add more examples) in an interview.

Kelsey’s lowest priority (in her resume, not in life!) is her education. This is important, but this is a case where kelsey wants to emphasize her skills and experience in action. So while it’s key to note that she has degrees and certification, it’s not necessarily her headline.

The key to crafting an effective resume is paying attention to what goes where. Templates and structure are great as a starting point, but you want your resume to make you shine—and that means customizing the doc to put your strongest professional qualities right under the nose of the resume reader.

If you’re looking for a food service job, thejobnetwork has you covered. check out the below listings to find a job in your area:


Watch the video: Midweek Meeting 2021 08 16 (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Moritz

    To merge. I agree with all of the above-said. We can talk about this topic. Here, or in the afternoon.

  2. Euryton

    Yes cannot be!

  3. Berkeley

    SpasibO we will use)

  4. Pimne

    When will the new articles appear? And then a month has passed. Want something new.

  5. Abdul-Hakim

    I regret, that I can not participate in discussion now. I do not own the necessary information. But with pleasure I will watch this theme.



Write a message